Four Things Every Professional Artist Need to Survive in Their Career

One question that a prospective art professional will eventually deal with: Can I make a living out of art and creatives?

The answer to this question is as complex as the question itself.

Our society has a lot of misconceptions about the world of creatives. Many think that art is a hopeless pursuit that offers no financial security, no middle ground, and no stability. We hear of stories about prospective artists, especially freelance or independent artists, with impressive credentials who still failed. These artist-failures are talented, committed and dedicated, yet unappreciated. Regrettably, their works get noticed and valued only posthumous.

But there’s also the other face of the art world – the highly successful and well-known artists who earn a celebrity status. There are acclaimed professional artists the likes of painter/sculptor Damien Hirst, sculptor Jeff Koons, painter Jasper Johns, muralist/graffiti artist David Choe, and painter Andrew Vicari. And of course, there are also those who have earned prominent recognitions in the art world.

To many people, the creative sector is a huge gamble where you either succeed or fail. It’s a “make or break” career that requires courage, perseverance, and hope. Some even think that you need the stroke of luck to make art a viable source of income.

However, there are some things you can do to help improve your chances at success.

Firstly, you need to have a goal. You have to define what you want in your career. Writing down your goals in a paper planner, like those reviewed here https://getlifeyoudesire.com/best-goal-planners-to-reach-your-goals/, can greatly help you in goal-setting. Creativity is the lifeblood of artists. As such, you explore new ideas and concepts. Unfortunately, it’s easy to get distracted by all these new stuff, and you end up not completing any of your tasks and goal. Having a written goal can help you get back to course whenever you lose track.

Secondly, you need to have the mindset of a small business owner. While it’s true that art is passion, you should be realistic. If creatives is your bread and butter, treat it as it is. If you’re a freelance artist, you have to think of basic business stuff like marketing, accounting, inventory, and sales. You need to build and maintain relationships with clients, galleries and other worthy connections. You may also want to self-promote through the internet and social media.

Thirdly, you need to be an expert in time-management. Unlike the regular office workers, artists have the liberty of time. You can choose when to work and when to rest. Such a very flexible schedule is both a curse and a boon. Artists require a tremendous amount of discipline and commitment. You have to stick with your work schedule and meet your deadlines. A planner from Get Life You Desire comes in handy to help organize your life.

Finally, you need to be wise financially. If you’re a self-employed artist, you have to learn how to manage your own finances such as paying for your own pension plan or healthcare plan. Majority of freelance artists supplement their income with another job. Doing so can help you get through difficult financial times or when you’re contract has ended. As you start your career, you need to learn how to budget.

Following in the footsteps, life and times of Jesus

It will be a contentious subject to talk about on any given day, mainly in lieu of our cultural diversity and, as a result, our broad religious beliefs. But, with few exceptions, there is consensus among scholars, religious philosophers, lay men and women, Rabbis, Imams, and many other religious schools of thought, that the personage of one Jesus Christ is authentic on most levels of human comprehension.

This post will appeal to devout Christians, born again or newly converted. It should be interesting to those who regard themselves as agnostic. To most artists, discussions and debates on the existence and the form He took, is essential for their own creativity.

Thoughts on Christ the movie star

Now that we’ve given you an extensive introduction, let us move on to a few thoughts on how Jesus Christ is interpreted in film. Because the post is short, we cannot go into detail on any particular aspect but interested readers can always broaden their knowledge by contacting us directly here or widening their own research via the internet or published texts.

Many believers and non-believers acknowledge that before He officially began his short ministry in the land of Canaan, He followed in the footsteps of His adopted father, one Joseph, a carpenter of note in the small town of Nazareth.

Some folks will believe this, others will refute it, but if He wanted to directly respond to a wanton act of faith from a follower, He could perform a miracle. A cheeky reviewer might remark that if He were living in the twenty-first century today, He would have no use for mechanical wood-crafting tools and pole saws such as some those listed on this website. Christ Almighty would have no need for just about any kind of saw, angle grinders or jigsaws. Bruce Almighty, on the other hand, will say that neither does he. Evan Almighty, however, given his performance in the film of the same name, may not just need the tools (and others) just mentioned, but he’d need a great deal of hands to help him out.

Christ the humorist

Fundamentalists, who, like the Pharisees in Jesus’ physical time on earth, contradict themselves time and time again, may not approve of this humorist approach towards introducing a review or profile on the scale of Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ or Jim Caviezel, the actor who portrayed Jesus in Gibson’s film work of art. Gibson, himself a sectarian, took a stab at Jesus being a good-natured man for all people by taking an intimate detour from the visually grim, violent and horrific ordeal of Christ’s enduring walk to Golgotha, showing Him hard at work crafting tables and chairs familiar to us today while adoring His Mother, Mary.

Christ the Son of God

Martin Scorsese tried his luck in imagining Christ as an adulterer. Apart from the condemnation, on an artistic level it simply didn’t work. But faith-centered Christians are still in awe of Roma Downey’s (of Touched by an Angel fame) pleasant presentation of Christ as He was in accordance with the Biblical transcriptions.