Following in the footsteps, life and times of Jesus

It will be a contentious subject to talk about on any given day, mainly in lieu of our cultural diversity and, as a result, our broad religious beliefs. But, with few exceptions, there is consensus among scholars, religious philosophers, lay men and women, Rabbis, Imams, and many other religious schools of thought, that the personage of one Jesus Christ is authentic on most levels of human comprehension.

This post will appeal to devout Christians, born again or newly converted. It should be interesting to those who regard themselves as agnostic. To most artists, discussions and debates on the existence and the form He took, is essential for their own creativity.

Thoughts on Christ the movie star

Now that we’ve given you an extensive introduction, let us move on to a few thoughts on how Jesus Christ is interpreted in film. Because the post is short, we cannot go into detail on any particular aspect but interested readers can always broaden their knowledge by contacting us directly here or widening their own research via the internet or published texts.

Many believers and non-believers acknowledge that before He officially began his short ministry in the land of Canaan, He followed in the footsteps of His adopted father, one Joseph, a carpenter of note in the small town of Nazareth.

Some folks will believe this, others will refute it, but if He wanted to directly respond to a wanton act of faith from a follower, He could perform a miracle. A cheeky reviewer might remark that if He were living in the twenty-first century today, He would have no use for mechanical wood-crafting tools and pole saws such as some those listed on this website. Christ Almighty would have no need for just about any kind of saw, angle grinders or jigsaws. Bruce Almighty, on the other hand, will say that neither does he. Evan Almighty, however, given his performance in the film of the same name, may not just need the tools (and others) just mentioned, but he’d need a great deal of hands to help him out.

Christ the humorist

Fundamentalists, who, like the Pharisees in Jesus’ physical time on earth, contradict themselves time and time again, may not approve of this humorist approach towards introducing a review or profile on the scale of Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ or Jim Caviezel, the actor who portrayed Jesus in Gibson’s film work of art. Gibson, himself a sectarian, took a stab at Jesus being a good-natured man for all people by taking an intimate detour from the visually grim, violent and horrific ordeal of Christ’s enduring walk to Golgotha, showing Him hard at work crafting tables and chairs familiar to us today while adoring His Mother, Mary.

Christ the Son of God

Martin Scorsese tried his luck in imagining Christ as an adulterer. Apart from the condemnation, on an artistic level it simply didn’t work. But faith-centered Christians are still in awe of Roma Downey’s (of Touched by an Angel fame) pleasant presentation of Christ as He was in accordance with the Biblical transcriptions.